What Is On The Other Side Of Space?

How far is the edge of the universe?

46.5 billion light-yearsThe comoving distance from Earth to the edge of the observable universe is about 14.26 gigaparsecs (46.5 billion light-years or 4.40×1026 m) in any direction.

The observable universe is thus a sphere with a diameter of about 28.5 gigaparsecs (93 billion light-years or 8.8×1026 m)..

Could we be living in a black hole?

A black hole is an object so dense that not even light can escape it. … Some researchers believe the universe emerged from the collapse of a star in a very different reality with five dimensions, meaning our reality was created by a black hole which we could still be living inside.

Does the universe have a center?

Space itself is curved, so as the universe expands from the Big Bang, it is somewhat like the two-dimensional space on a balloon. But just like the surface of that balloon, there is no center in the universe.

What is inside a black hole?

The event horizon is where the escape speed exceeds the speed of light: you’d have to be going faster than light (which is impossible for any bit of matter) to escape the black hole’s gravity. Inside the event horizon is where physics goes crazy. … A singularity is what all the matter in a black hole gets crushed into.

What is on the other side of the expanding universe?

The universe is infinite, so it cannot (by definition) expand into anything and there is nothing on the other side.

Is the universe really infinite?

The observable universe is still huge, but it has limits. That’s because we know the universe isn’t infinitely old — we know the Big Bang occurred some 13.8 billion years ago. That means that light has had “only” 13.8 billion years to travel.

What is beyond the end of the universe?

Beyond the Hubble Volume. Astronomers think space might be infinite, with “stuff” (energy, galaxies, etc.) distributed pretty much the same as it is in the observable universe. … Beyond the Hubble Volume you won’t just find more, different planets. You will eventually find every possible thing.

Can space travel faster than light?

There is no limit to how fast the universe can expand, says physicist Charles Bennett of Johns Hopkins University. Einstein’s theory that nothing can travel faster than the speed of light in a vacuum still holds true, because space itself is stretching, and space is nothing.

What was before the universe?

The initial singularity is a gravitational singularity predicted by general relativity to have existed before the Big Bang and thought to have contained all the energy and spacetime of the Universe.

Who created universe?

The earliest cosmological models of the universe were developed by ancient Greek and Indian philosophers and were geocentric, placing Earth at the center. Over the centuries, more precise astronomical observations led Nicolaus Copernicus to develop the heliocentric model with the Sun at the center of the Solar System.

What is on the other side of outer space?

Nothing is outside of outer space. Space is expanding into nonexistence. Space itself is not “nothing”. It has lenght, width, height, and duration (four primary dimensions) plus other dimensions which we can mathematically describe in physics but not detect in the universe.

What is on the other side of a black hole?

The event horizon is a proposed boundary around a black hole. On the other side of it, the gravitational pull of the black hole is so strong that, in order to escape it, an object would have to be moving faster than the speed of light, a feat that almost all physicists agree is impossible.

What does space smell like?

sweet-smelling welding fumes’, ‘burning metal’, ‘a distinct odour of ozone, an acrid smell’, ‘walnuts and brake pads’, ‘gunpowder’ and even ‘burnt almond cookie’. Some astronauts have likened the smells of space to walnuts.

How empty is space?

Outer space is not completely empty—it is a hard vacuum containing a low density of particles, predominantly a plasma of hydrogen and helium, as well as electromagnetic radiation, magnetic fields, neutrinos, dust, and cosmic rays.

What is beyond the space?

Astronomers think space outside of the observable universe might be an infinite expanse of what we see in the cosmos around us, distributed pretty much the same as it is in the observable universe. … After all, it doesn’t make sense that one section of the universe would be different than what we see around us.

What’s at the edge of the universe?

There is no edge to the universe, as far as we know. There’s an edge to the observable universe—we can only see so far out. That’s because light travels at a finite speed (one light-year per year), so as we look at distant things we’re also looking backward in time.

How many light years is the edge of the universe?

93 billion light yearsThe observable Universe is, of course, much larger. According to current thinking it is about 93 billion light years in diameter.

Does space have a end?

No, they don’t believe there’s an end to space. However, we can only see a certain volume of all that’s out there. Since the universe is 13.8 billion years old, light from a galaxy more than 13.8 billion light-years away hasn’t had time to reach us yet, so we have no way of knowing such a galaxy exists.

Can we see the edge of the universe?

As far as we can tell, there is no edge to the universe. Space spreads out infinitely in all directions. Furthermore, galaxies fill all of the space through-out the entire infinite universe. This conclusion is reached by logically combining two observations.

Can a black hole kill you?

But that all changed in the early 1990s when different research teams in Canada and the US discovered a second singularity called a “mass inflation singularity.” It still has a strong gravitational pull, but it would only stretch you by a finite amount, and potentially NOT kill you in the process, meaning, you might …

Does time exist in a black hole?

Black holes do not exist where space and time do not exist, says new theory. (Phys.org) —The quintessential feature of a black hole is its “point of no return,” or what is more technically called its event horizon. … At least, this is what happens in traditional black hole models based on general relativity.